Saturday, June 4, 2016

The Granville



I had shirts on the brain for a while, and I thought to try out the Granville from Sewaholic.  Lately I am of the opinion that one really needs two shirt patterns to fall back on:  one that is well fitted for use with sturdier and crisper fabrics, as well as a looser fitting pattern for softer fabrics.  (That’s my thinking to-day.  Tomorrow I might be of a totally different opinion.)  The Granville definitely falls into the “well fitted” category.
The pattern had been lying around here for some time, and in January I finally decided to start a muslin (in muslin, of course). 
muslin front
Before I got anywhere near finishing that, I realized that I needed to sew a shirt sample for my shirt class.  Muslin got thrown aside, and a white shirt was zipped up without too much thought on how it would fit me.  (I’ll deal with any “issues” when the shirt comes home from the store.)  
white front
Once class samples were ensconced in the store, it was back to tweaking the pattern. 
muslin back
First and foremost – the sleeves were far too long.  I’d already sewn the vent and cuff on the muslin (I did intend for it to be a wearable piece), so the only option for shortening was to do it from the top.  Secondly, there was too much sticking out at the hip (the Jetson’s look, my daughter calls it – if you recall how clothes look on Mrs. Jetson in the cartoon by that name).  That was an easy fix.  Thirdly, there was some weird “pouf” across the front.  I seem to have no problem slashing and mangling other people’s patterns to get them a good fit, but when it comes to my own …  I decided to be brave and do what my gut instinct (and all sorts of fitting books and instructions tell me) – I took an inch out of the centre of the front piece.  The bust dart disappears.  (Yeah!  No darts to sew!)  And … problem solved – no more weird pouf.  So, that makes two shirts with darts that are perfectly wearable, just not so perfectly fitted.  Onward.
Japanese print front
A new shipment of fabric at Joyce’s brought a Japanese calligraphy print.  Don’t know why, but I just had to have it.  For a shirt. 
Japanese print back
I added some coordinating black print to take this out of the boring zone. 
By this point, I was also looking at tweaking other bits on this pattern, so I squared off the collar.  So much easier to turn a perfect point when it’s a 45° angle!  And I didn’t add the sewn-on front band. 
I widened the sleeve at the bottom, which added a few pleats so that it would fit into the cuff.  I just happen to like my shirt sleeves a tad wider than what the pattern gives me.
polka dot front
Finally I decided to use a white with black dot mystery fabric, more for the sake of finally using up the fabric, than actually needing yet another shirt. 
polka dot back
This one got front bands on both front pieces.  And heaven forbid that this one should be plain and boring, hence the black piping. 
I actually googled images of “piping on shirts” before I could make a decision of where to use the piping.  Sad, I know.  You’d think that something like that shouldn’t stop production and waste time.  But sometimes you just have to reassure yourself that you’re heading in the right direction.  (By the way – there are so many variations of where to place piping and where not to place piping, it’s rather mind boggling.)
After 4 shirts in under 3 months (I finished the 4th in March, I believe), I’m quite over shirts with collar bands for the time being.  I’m still not 100% happy with my tweaks.  The cuffs are a bit large for my wrists.  I was focusing on other issues, and quite overlooked that fact until I actually started wearing the shirts.  Something to deal with the next time I use this pattern.

17 comments:

  1. Very nice shirts Irene - so many that you should be sorted for a while now! What a great idea to sew a few in a row, that really streamlines your sewing technique!

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    1. I did work out some kinks, sewing one after the other.

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  2. Great collection of blouses... love the fabrics & detail.

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  3. Great collection of blouses... love the fabrics & detail.

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  4. Love the black piping on the black/white shirt..wonderful work!

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  5. Nice trio of shirts. My fav is the Japanese print. Shirts can be a fair about of sewing, especially when you add piping and other interesting details. I am always surprised how long it takes me to sew a shirt.

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    1. It does take some time - it's all those pesky details that don't look right if you hurry.

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  6. Your shirt making efforts put my recent attempt at an Archer shirt to shame. Love the piped version and would really appreciate a tutorial on making perfect collar stands. Mine always scream home made.

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    1. I'll certainly keep your request in mind -i.e. must keep camera close to sewing machine!

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  7. These are all beautifully made shirts and I love that they all look so different. I agree with Audrey, I find shirts very time consuming and don't make them very often, but they really require practice to get them looking this good.

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    1. It is all in the details ... or you end up with a sorry-looking shirt ... unfortunately.

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  8. You've been on a shirt making blitz!! They all look pretty fabulous to me, I really love that Chinese script print, and of course your piping is perfection. However the picture of your first sample is REALLY making me crave a shirtdress for myself ;)

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    1. Thank-you! I, too, have shirtdresses on the brain (but so do half the bloggers out there!).

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  9. Irene, Beautiful shirts. I especially love the white with black poka dots. Superb.

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